Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Heating Degree Days Drop Again in 2017

Prime: 
prime
Subtitle: 
It’s not happening everywhere, but Atlanta, Aspen, and other places saw the downward trend of HDD continue
Images: 

We've had some beautiful cool weather here in Atlanta this spring. It's about 50°F outdoors as I write this, one week into the month of May. The high yesterday was only about 70°F.

We're getting a few more heating degree days (HDDThe difference between the 24-hour average (daily) temperature and the base temperature for one year for each day that the average is below the base temperature. For heating degree days, the base is usually 65 degrees Fahrenheit. For example, if the average temperature for December 1, 2001 was 30 degrees Fahrenheit, then the number of heating degrees for that day was 35.) in the middle of May. (Heating degree days are really just another way at looking at temperature, which I explained in more detail in a look at the fundamentals of degree days.) We occasionally pick up some HDD even in July and August. But it's the winter HDD that matter for heating — and that give us a clue about the climate.

read more



from Building Science http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/articles/dept/building-science/heating-degree-days-drop-again-2017

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Installing Basement Waterproofing from the ‘Negative’ Side

Subtitle: 
Of course the best way to waterproof any below-grade assembly is from the exterior — but what if you have to work from the interior?
Images: 

Negative-side waterproofing (NSW) is a tough topic that I have frankly been dancing around for quite some time. Manufacturer claims and homeowner anecdotes of successful interior waterproof solutions for basement walls and slabs did not completely add up. But I did not think that I understood the topic or the physics well enough to challenge the claims or explain my skepticism.

read more



from Building Science http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/building-science/installing-basement-waterproofing-negative-side

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Three Easy and Essential Advanced Framing Techniques

Prime: 
prime
Subtitle: 
Stick-built homes that don’t use these techniques are missing an easy opportunity to save energy and cut construction costs
Images: 

Most new homes in North America are built with sticks. The early home builders used bigger pieces of wood — timbers — and when the smaller dimensional lumber that we use so much today hit the market, they scoffed at those new-fangled little woody things, calling them sticks. Now our home construction industry is full of people who do stick building and the home you live is most likely stick-built. And sadly, many of the techniques used to build many of those homes are the same used before we started insulating them.

read more



from Building Science http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/articles/dept/building-science/three-easy-and-essential-advanced-framing-techniques

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

The Difficulty of Updating Georgia’s Energy Code

Prime: 
prime
Subtitle: 
Trying to get airtightness below 7 ach50 has been a struggle
Images: 

Seven years ago, Georgia led the nation. Yep. We were the first state to adopt an energy code that made blower door testing mandatory. All new homes built in the state had to show through performance testing that they had an air leakage rate of less than 7 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals of pressure difference (ach50).

read more



from Building Science http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/articles/dept/building-science/difficulty-updating-georgia-s-energy-code

Thursday, April 27, 2017

The Energy Conservatory’s New Blower Door Kit

Subtitle: 
TEC did its homework: its new blower door package is a truly engineered and integrated equipment system
Images: 

I don’t do blower door work every day, but I do enough of it to appreciate the attention to detail that The Energy Conservatory (TEC) built into its new blower door kit. The kit features a digital pressure and air flow gauge, the DG1000.

read more



from Building Science http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/building-science/energy-conservatory-s-new-blower-door-kit

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Questions to Ask Your Prospective Builder

Prime: 
prime
Subtitle: 
Getting the answers could help you avoid picking the wrong builder
Images: 

You're having your dream house built. You're into the design phase, working with an architect or looking through collections of house plans. You're doing your homework, trying to find out how to ensure you get a top quality house. And that's when you run into all this stuff about building science, high performance homes, HVAC(Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning). Collectively, the mechanical systems that heat, ventilate, and cool a building. design, blower door testing, and the like. Now you're hooked.

read more



from Building Science http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/articles/dept/building-science/questions-ask-your-prospective-builder

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

The Hidden Flaw in Some High-Efficiency Furnaces

Prime: 
prime
Subtitle: 
Hint: Furnaces use two forms of energy
Images: 

You can tell how energy-efficient a furnace is by its official efficiency rating, the Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency(AFUE) Widely-used measure of the fuel efficiency of a heating system that accounts for start-up, cool-down, and other operating losses that occur during real-life operation. AFUE is always lower than combustion efficiency. Furnaces sold in the United States must have a minimum AFUE of 78%. High ratings indicate more efficient equipment. (AFUEAnnual Fuel Utilization Efficiency. Widely-used measure of the fuel efficiency of a heating system that accounts for start-up, cool-down, and other operating losses that occur during real-life operation. AFUE is always lower than combustion efficiency. Furnaces sold in the United States must have a minimum AFUE of 78%. High ratings indicate more efficient equipment. ). It's a measure of how much of the heat originally in the fuel that's being burned is available for delivery to the home. The more heat that gets lost up the flue or through the cabinet, the lower the AFUE.

But that rating doesn't capture all the ways a furnace can lose efficiency. Some, like how well the heat gets distributed to the house, aren't related to the furnace itself. But there's one big one that is related to the furnace.

read more



from Building Science http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/articles/dept/building-science/hidden-flaw-some-high-efficiency-furnaces